Stock marks

In cutting forging stockA wrought rod, bar, or other section suitable for subsequent change in cross section by forging. to specified length for a die-forged part, the ends of the barA section hot rolled from a billet to a form, such as round, hexagonal, octagonal, square, or rectangular, with sharp or rounded corners or edges, with a cross-sectional area of less than 16 sq in. (A solid section that is long in relation to its cross-sectional dimensions, having a completely symmetrical cross section and whose width or greatest distance between parallel faces is 3/8 in. or more).... More always contain surface imperfections caused by the cutting tool; these are often retained on the surface of the finished part. If pronounced, such marks are removed by light grinding. On parts where repeated indications of stock marksIn cutting forging stock to specified length for a die-forged part, the ends of the bar always contain surface imperfections caused by the cutting tool; these are often retained on the surface of the finished part. If pronounced, such marks are removed by light grinding. On parts where repeated indications of stock marks are encountered, efforts are usually made to eliminate them by conditioning the stock ends prior to forging by polishing the cut ends and beveling the edge of the cut.... More are encountered, efforts are usually made to eliminate them by conditioning the stockThe material to be forged regardless of form. Also, an individual piece of metal used to produce a single forging. ends prior to forgingThe process of working metal to a desired shape by impact or pressure in hammers, forging machines (upsetters), presses, rolls, and related forming equipment. by polishing the cut ends and beveling the edge of the cut.