FAQ

Yes. The maximum forge dieThe machined recess in a dieThe machined recess in a die that gives the forging its shape. that gives the forgingThe process of working metal to a desired shape by impact or pressure in hammers, forging machines (upsetters), presses, rolls, and related forming equipment. its shape. size for our hammers is 24”x 28” deep. If your part has dieThe machined recess in a dieThe machined recess in a die that gives the forging its shape. that gives the forging its shape. progressions that will fit into that area and can be made using a round-bar billetA semifinished, cogged, hot-rolled, or continuous-cast metal product of uniform section, usually rectangular with radiused corners. Billets are relatively larger than bars. See BloomA semifinished product of square, rectangular, or even round cross section, hot rolled, or forged. For steel, the width of a bloom is not more than twice the thickness, and the cross sectional area is usually not less than about 36 sq. in. No invariable rule prevails for distinguishing between blooms and billets; the terms are frequently used interchangeably.... More. of 2.25” or smaller we can definitely handle the project. This usually equates to a size limit of about 15-20 lbs.

We run air-lift, gravity-drop style hammers using closed impressionA cavityThe machined recess in a die that gives the forging its shape., or series of cavities (multiple(1) Term used to describe a die impression designed to produce more than a single piece at a time. (2) A piece of stock for forging that is cut from bar or billet lengths to provide the exact amount of material needed for a single workpiece.), machined into a forging die to produce a desired configuration in the workpiece during forging. diesThe metal blocks into which forging impressions are machined and from which forgings are produced. to form our product.

We use induction heatingHeating metals by means of an alternating magnetic field. to get our raw material to proper forgingThe process of working metal to a desired shape by impact or pressure in hammers, forging machines (upsetters), presses, rolls, and related forming equipment. temperatureThe temperatureThe temperature of the forging stock just prior to forging. of the forging stockA wrought rod, bar, or other section suitable for subsequent change in cross section by forging. just prior to forging.. Even though it will heatAmount of forging stockA wrought rod, bar, or other section suitable for subsequent change in cross section by forging. placed in a batch-type furnace at one time. aluminum, we cannot keep it at proper forging temperatureThe temperatureThe temperature of the forging stock just prior to forging. of the forging stockThe material to be forged regardless of form. Also, an individual piece of metal used to produce a single forging. just prior to forging. throughout the hammer forgingThe mechanical forming of metal by means of a hammerA machine that applies a sharp blow to the work area through the fall of a ram onto an anvil. The ram can be driven by gravity or power. See also Gravity Hammer and Power-Driven Hammer.. The action of the hammer is that of an instantaneous application of pressure in the form of a sudden blow. process. Aluminum forgings would best be produced on a forging pressA machine tool with a stationary bed and a slide or ramThe main reciprocating member of a press, guided in the press frame, to which the punch or upper die is fastened. that has reciprocating motion at right angles to the bed surface; the ram is guided in the frameThe main structure of a press. of the machine..

At Trenton we can forge steel, steel alloys, and stainless steel.

Heating steel billets and forming them in a way that retains or improves the grainAn individual crystal in a polycrystalline metal or alloy. structure the material was original drawn with produces a product that is superior in strength and longevity to a casting, fabrication, or machined part. In most cases this leads to a lighter and more efficient package. Forgings also reduce the cost of scrap that is common with machining or other subtractive-manufacturing processes. Forming a near-net shape part to begin with leads to less post-processing.

See our video here: “How a Forging is Made